Krill Bill: The Hidden Toll of Krill Oil Supplements

There is no better antidote to human hubris than a bathroom scale. For all that we’ve achieved, our species remains a minuscule part of Nature, and unlikely to be missed if we had anywhere else to go to. To put things in perspective, consider the krill – a tiny crustacean that does nothing but feed on plankton. Just one single subspecies of krill would be sufficient to displace the entire mass of humanity – twice.

Fortunately, our race has taken prompt remedial action by harvesting them for food. Their processed remains are now found in animal feed as a form of “protein bulk”, which is effectively a seafood equivalent of the “mystery” in “mystery meat”. As fisheries go they aren’t making huge profits from these sales, but the enterprising plough on nonetheless for a very good reason. It turns out that these little creatures secrete buckets of pure gold.

The benefits of krill oil are now emblazoned throughout health stores; salespeople on commission are tattooing them on their foreheads for good measure. There is at least one promising ingredient in them: a form of anti-oxidant called astaxanthin. Research on its potential health benefits is ongoing, but at least there’s no question of food safety. Most national regulatory bodies already classify it as a legal food colouring additive.

This colourful antioxidant is now poised to steal the fish-oil thunder, by virtue of its relative purity and superior benefits. Of course, it’s quite difficult to pinpoint exactly where the superiority lies, since fish oils contain a larger variety of anti-oxidants, all of which come with proven benefits. (It must be noted that uric acid, the most abundant form of anti-oxidant in the human body, is responsible for gout when it is too readily available.) Omega-3, an essential fatty acid, is also conspicuously absent in krill oils. This is because the oils are derived from deep-sea fish that have been feeding on omega-3 rich microalgae all its life, whereas individual krills have too small a body mass to store anything within its flesh.

The tattooed salespeople would probably remind you at this point that this also happens to be the reason krill oils are free from heavy metal poisons, since they can’t accumulate anything properly. However, any decent manufacturer would put their marine oil products through a rigorous distillation process. With fish oil, you have a purified condensate of fatty acid; with krill oil, you have a purified mixture of colour additives.

So if you don’t want to lose out on the potential benefits of krill oil, there’s one cost-effective solution you can take. Simply buy fish oils impregnated with astaxanthin, and you will have hedged your bets without accidentally upsetting the balance in our ecology, or the balance in your bank account. Do not under any circumstances neglect your omega-3 intake, since it’s now conclusively associated with a wide range of cardiovascular and degenerative disorders.

Besides, when we’re dealing with dietary supplements, the devil you know beats the devil you don’t. Who knows what those shrimp-like creatures are up to anyway? There are so many of them.

Natural Pet Care – The Most Common Misconceptions

There are a lot of misconceptions about natural pet care. Some people think it is not as effective as conventional medications. Some people think it is not safe and are worried about the side effects. Some people think it is too pricey. Some people, not surprisingly, have not heard of natural care for pets at all. This article, as you can guess from the title, aims to throw some light on pet care and gives you some tips to take care of your pets naturally.

First of all, let me tell you what natural pet care is all about. It involves treating and preventing your pet’s health problems in the most natural manner possible. In other words, it is not just about treating diseases, but preventing them by strengthening the immune system of your pet. Now, let us take a look at some of the most common misconceptions about holistic pet care.

Misconception #1 – Natural medications are not as effective as conventional medications.

Herbal and homeopathic medications can be very effective. Medical research behind conventional products are usually better documented than natural approaches, however the role of natural products and anti0oxidants in particular, have recently shown to be beneficial to humans and pets. While natural products cannot replace conventional medications altogether, they are certainly a good choice for people who are looking for a safe and effective way to treat their pet’s health problems.

Misconception #2 – Natural medications are not safe for pets.

It is quite ironic that a lot of people are under the impression that natural pet care is not safe for their pets. Do you know why? Most people who choose natural remedies do so because they have fewer or no side effects vs. many prescription drugs available on the market today. Since most of the ingredients in these natural remedies are completely organic, the chances of allergic reactions or other such side effects are lower.

Misconception #3 – Natural medications are too pricey.

Many owners provide healthy dose of natural remedies every day as a way of avoiding more costly illnesses. A month’s supply of these natural supplements costs just under $50.or less than $2 a day. While $50 is a lot of money, they can help avoid costly issues. These products are not only safe, and affordable.

Misconception #4 – Herbal remedies are usually manufactured by quacks with fake degrees and are not approved by the FDA.

There are a number of high quality herbal dietary supplements for pets on the market today. They are approved by the FDA and are very safe. However, this does not mean that there are no fake herbal products on the market at all. Just like any other field today, natural pet care has its own share of fake experts as well. To avoid such substandard products, you need to go for a good natural remedy which is manufactured under the supervision of a qualified pharmacist and meets the guidelines set by the DSHEA (Dietary Supplement Health Education Act).

I hope the article clarified your doubts on natural pet care. Consider the advantages and the disadvantages of treating your pets naturally and make an informed decision today.

Pig Feeding Guide

Feeding pigs depends a lot on how old the pigs are. If they are reproducing, the state they are in at the time is an indication of how they should be fed. Foraging pigs should be allowed to obtain some food on their own but should also be given supplements to make sure all they get the necessary nutrients. Foraging pigs eat a variety of things they find such as apples, acorns, brambles and since by nature pigs are omnivores they will eat the occasional earthworm. Also any other fruits and vegetables are good for pigs as long as the fruits and vegetables are not from a kitchen. Food from a kitchen or anywhere that meat is sold cannot be given to pigs that are being bred for commercial production under law. More specifically, it is illegal to feed any household waste to pigs that are being bred for production purposes. This is due to the threat of disease from contamination by animal by-products.

Feed supplements help balance the diet of pigs

In addition to these foods a feed supplement should be fed to pigs. Feed supplements are designed to give animals all or part of the daily nutrients they need to be in optimal condition for breeding or commercial production. Feed supplements come in a variety of forms such as pencils, cakes and meal. The supplements are made from combining many of the foods that animals already eat into a balanced mixture.

Feeding pigs changes when they are breeding

Pigs like their food wet. If you are preparing feed for pigs you should add water to moisten the feed, goats milk is also good for this purpose but keep in mind the milk cannot be waste from a kitchen. When feeding pigs it is best to have troughs to help ensure all the pigs get enough food. This may seem unnecessary but when pigs are foraging, the most aggressive pigs get more food and less aggressive pigs sometimes do not get enough to eat. Having pig troughs helps solve this problem.

Gilts should be given supplements to their natural diet, a good choice sow breeder pencils, cakes or meal specifically designed for gilts. This should be kept up until just before the farrowing period. Maiden gilts are in need of a lot of supplements because even though they are caring unborn young, they are still growing. So the guilt maiden will need to have her feed gradually increased until she delivers. After service there is no need to continue the regime. Once the litter is born the sow needs extra supplements to support both her own nutritional needs and to produce enough milk for the suckling piglets.